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Waterfront Vacation Rental Beach House in Gregory Town

4   3.0   Sleeps: 12   Pool: No    Pets: No
Nightly Rate: $357-$693   Minimum Stay: 7 nights

Welcome to Moonflower! This beachfront home, completely remodeled in 2015, sits on Gaulding Cay, one of the...

Ad # 828580    2250-129368 



Gregory Town - Beach Information - Fun Things to Do - Tips

Gregory Town stands in the center of Eleuthera against a backdrop of hills, which break the landscape's usual flat monotony. A village of clapboard cottages, it was once famous for growing pineapples. Though the industry isn't as strong as it was in the past, the locals make good pineapple rum out of the fruit, and you can still visit the Gregory Town Plantation and Distillery, where it's produced. You're allowed to sample it, and we can almost guarantee you'll want to take a bottle home with you.

Gregory Town Beach in Eleuthera Bahamas At a narrow point of the island a few miles north of Gregory Town, a slender concrete bridge links two sea-battered bluffs that separate the island's Central and North districts. Gregory Town Beach in Eleuthera Bahamas Sailors going south in the waters between New Providence and Eleuthera supposedly named this area the Glass Window because they could see through the natural limestone arch to the Atlantic on the other side. Stop to watch the northeasterly deep-azure Atlantic swirl together under the bridge with the southwesterly turquoise Bight of Eleuthera, producing a brilliant aquamarine froth. Artist Winslow Homer found the site stunning, and painted Glass Window in 1885. The original stone arch, created by Mother Nature, was destroyed by a combination of storms in the 1940s. Subsequent concrete bridges were destroyed by hurricanes in 1992 and 1999. Drive carefully, because there is frequent maintenance work going on.